Monthly Archive April 24, 2019

Byadmin

Summer Showers on 22nd April causes heavy damage in Telangana

Manchiryal
Heavy rains on 22nd April caused heavy damage to paddy crop, mango crop, paddy stored at home and market yards and to the infrastructure like the electricity poles etc

reported by Punnam, Kisan Mitra Team, Manchiryal, Telangana

Byadmin

Global warming shrank Indian economy by 31 per cent: Study

By:  | Published: April 23, 2019 11:43 AM
https://www.financialexpress.com/economy/global-warming-shrank-indian-economy-by-31-per-cent-study/1556339/?fbclid=IwAR3a59WA1ktYIGlRlUsd2-rdZNmHy2ksIlVI2yui_3tPItpPatUh4nB1SUU

Global warming has caused the Indian economy to be 31 per cent smaller than it would otherwise have been, according to a Stanford study which shows how Earth’s temperature changes have increased inequalities.

While the impacts of temperature may seem small from year to year, they can yield dramatic gains or losses over time.

Global warming has caused the Indian economy to be 31 per cent smaller than it would otherwise have been, according to a Stanford study which shows how Earth’s temperature changes have increased inequalities. The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed that growing concentrations of greenhouse gases in Earth’s atmosphere since 1960s have enriched cool countries like Norway and Sweden, while dragging down economic growth in warm countries such as India and Nigeria. “Our results show that most of the poorest countries on Earth are considerably poorer than they would have been without global warming,” said climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh, from Stanford University in the US.
“At the same time, the majority of rich countries are richer than they would have been,” Diffenbaugh said in a statement. The study from 1961 to 2010, global warming decreased the wealth per person in the world’s poorest countries by 17 to 30 per cent. Meanwhile, the gap between the group of nations with the highest and lowest economic output per person is now approximately 25 per cent larger than it would have been without climate change.
While the impacts of temperature may seem small from year to year, they can yield dramatic gains or losses over time. “This is like a savings account, where small differences in the interest rate will generate large differences in the account balance over 30 or 50 years,” said Diffenbaugh.
After accumulating decades of small effects from warming, India’s economy is now 31 per cent smaller than it would have been in the absence of global warming, he said. Although economic inequality between countries has decreased in recent decades, the research suggests the gap would have narrowed faster without global warming. The study builds on previous research in the team analysed 50 years of annual temperature and GDP measurements for 165 countries to estimate the effects of temperature fluctuations on economic growth. They demonstrated that growth during warmer than average years has accelerated in cool nations and slowed in warm nations.
“The historical data clearly show that crops are more productive, people are healthier and we are more productive at work when temperatures are neither too hot nor too cold,” said Marshall Burke, a Stanford assistant professor of Earth system science. “This means that in cold countries, a little bit of warming can help. The opposite is true in places that are already hot,” said Burke.

Tropical countries, in particular, tend to have temperatures far outside the ideal for economic growth. “There’s essentially no uncertainty that they’ve been harmed,” he said. It’s less clear how warming has influenced growth in countries in the middle latitudes, including the US, China and Japan. For these and other temperate-climate nations, the analysis reveals economic impacts of less than 10 per cent.

Bydivya

Loss of Mango crop in Telangana due to high windspeed on April 22nd


Information applicable for Rabi 2019:
Source: WBCIS Telangana Rabi 2018-19 notification

  • Mango crop is insured in all districts of Telangana under WBCIS.
  • Insuring agency:
    • Bajaj Allizanz – Mahabubnagar, Jogulamba, Vikarabad, Mahbubabad, Mancherial, Malkanjbiri
    • Agriculture Insurance Company of India Limited in all other districts
  • Total sum insured per tree:
    • Age 5 to 15 years: Rs. 450
    • Age 16 to 50 years: Rs. 800
  • All loanee farmers who were sanctioned bank loans before December 15th, 2018 should have automatically been enrolled.

Details on conditions for insurance claims due to excess rainfall and windspeed

  • Excess rainfall
    1. After 1st of March, if two days consecutive rainfall exceeds 70 mm, farmers with trees aged 5-15 years will be paid Rs. 10 per tree per mm of excess rainfall, up to a maximum of 100 rupees per tree. Farmers with trees aged 16-50 years will be paid Rs.18 per tree per mm of excess rainfall, up to a maximum of 175 rupees per tree.
  • High Windspeed:
    1. From 1st of April to 30th of April, trees are insured in case of high windspeed (upward deviation of daily maximum windspeed), in excess of 35 KMPH
    2. Trees aged 5- 15 years: Payment is Rs. 11.25 per tree, with additional 1.5 rupee per KMPH over 35, up to a maximum of 33.75 rupees per tree
    3. Trees aged 16-20 years: Payment is Rs. 20.25 per tree, with additional 2.70 per KMPH over 35, up to a maximum of 60.75 rupees per tree
    4. Payment will be made only for a single event of maximum intensity – not for multiple events

@Divya Veluguri